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's apparently wrapped up talk in cairo with president morsi, who this time yesterday was saying a truce, at least a cease-fire of some sorts, was just hours, hours away. let's go to tel aviv. sara sidner is standing by. tell our viewers what happened just a few hours ago. >> reporter: around noon, tel aviv time, there was an explosion on the number 61 bus. it was very close to the military headquarters here, very close to the courts here, along a street that was eventually block off by police. at least 22 people were injured, some of those people were on the bus, some outside the bus. they suffered everything from panic attacks to a couple teenagers who have the worst of the injuries. we talked to the e.r. doctor who told us one of the teenagers may lose a limb, perhaps an arm because of the soft tissue that's been blasted away. also a lot of shrapnel wounds in the face. both may face a lifetime of disability. those are his words. we talked to the police, more still looking for a suspect, trying to find out who was responsible. we saw the bus before testify driven away. all the windows
's in cairo and meeting with the egyptian president mohammed morsi who has emerged as a key player in the effort to try to end the fighting between israel and hamas. but mr. morsi walking a very tight political and social, for that matter, tight rope. reza sayah joining us from cairo. reza, morsi playing a pivot on the role, as egypt has in the past, in these talks. balancing the expectations of his street, the people that elected him and the muslim brotherhood, as well as the u.s. and the international community and all that is bound into that. >> yeah. michael, in many ways as we speak today egyptian president mohammed morsi is viewed as maybe the most important voice for the palestinians on the world stage, and to understand the type of pressure he is under it's so important to understand how arabs, how egyptians view this conflict between the palestinians and the israelis because it is very different from the western view. egyptians, arabs, look at the latest round of fighting, and they see more than 130 palestinians killed compared to five israelis killed. they should taking o
are set to resume tomorrow in cairo. the egyptians have been mediating cease-fire talks following this month's deadly eight-day conflict over gaza. a hamas spokesman said topics will include opening border crossings and easing israel's economic blockade of gaza. >>> and in bangladesh, at least 117 people, most of them women, are dead and 200 others hurt after fire rips through a clothing factory. some 2,000 people were working inside the nine-story building when the blaze broke out. the casualty count is expected to rise. >>> the muslim brotherhood says one of its members, a 15-year-old boy, was killed today. and another 60 people injured in an attack on the group's headquarters in the egyptian town of damanaur. leaders say the boy was killed by thugs in the "the total absence of police forces." the violence is part of clashes that erupted across egypt last week after president mohamed morsi issued a sweeping decree that significantly expands his own powers. let's go to cairo now where reza is following the story. what do we know about this attack? >> reporter: obviously, we've se
pictures now. cairo, egypt, tahrir square. and thousands of people are refusing to go home. they are angry at their president. they say he's made himself a dictator. it's quiet now in cairo. it's just after 2:00 a.m., but it definitely was not quiet earlier in the day. listen. tear gas filled the air and crowds of protesters scattered when riot police tried to break up the protests in cairo. we have reports of demonstrators trying to break into the offices of the president's party, the muslim brotherhood. and at least one person reportedly died today in the street violence, a teenager. cnn's reza sayah spent much of the day right in the middle of the chaos in cairo. >> we keep seeing these clashes between protesters and police, protesters throwing rocks at police. police responding by firing tear gas and stun grenades. we're just a few blocks away from tahrir square. we should point out most of these protesters are young men, 20-something, teenagers, hard to say if they're here fighting for democracy or here to cause some trouble. those were chants of down with president mo
is good. my money. my choice. my meineke. >>> cairo to istanbul, anger erupting over the latest conflict involving israel and hamas. these pictures come to us from indonesia, more than 5,000 people march through the streets of jakarta sunday, protesting israeli air strikes. the crowd marched to the u.s. embassy carrying flag and posters condemning israel. let's turn to egypt and a narrow strip of land that borders gaza. the rafa border, that's the crossing, this is gaza's only gateway to an arab ally. let's turn from this map to what is happening on the ground. the rafah crossing has become a dangerous place to be. it is a major crossing point for protesters and for those who are trying to smuggle weapons and supplies into gaza. israel says it is bombing smuggling tunnels that run under rafah. the border crossing is clogged with anti-israel protesters, trying to gain access to gaza. reza sayah reports. >> reporter: this is where egypt's border meets gaza. gaza is a small piece of land, about twice the size of washington, d.c. it has four gateways, three of them are inside israel. they're
in the west bank the right now she is in cairo meeting with egypt's president. mor morrissey is trying to broker a and when it happens we'll bring it to you live. wolf, i just wanted to ask about this bus attack in tel aviv. how large of a shadow does it cast? >> it's a very big shadow, the first time in at least i'm guessing six years that tel aviv has seen a terrorist incident like this. not that far away from the real commercial hub of the city. regular bus and about 20 people were injured. apparently a terrorist threw a bomb or whatever on the bus and escaped. the israelis did arrest someone later, but it proved to be a false arrest and they let that person go. there is someone on the loose right now who committed this. there are various groups claiming responsibility, though authoritatively no one has yet claimed responsibility. hamas did claim the incident, celebrated it, but didn't claim responsibility for it. one terrorist group claimed responsibility, but it's unclear from analysts if that's just a group trying to claim credibility that they had no involvement in. whatever it
. and the next great idea could be yours. ♪ >>> welcome back. talks are set to resume tomorrow in cairo between israeli and see egyptians to hammer out the details of the cease-fire with hamas. israeli troops have retreated from the border and hamas leaders say a delegation from gaza has arrived in cairo. on the table? opening border crossings and easing israel's economic blockade in gaza. crowds in gaza celebrated at the end of the eight-day deadly conflict. >>> so ken, the palestinian israeli cease-fire hold, a man who advised six secretaries of state on the middle east is assessing it from many angles, he's a long-time author and diplomatic policymaker. i asked him who has the upper hand in this conflict. >> there are two clear winners. hamas for sure. look at it very simply. it was ham par mrkhamas oi rock have once again put the palestinians on stage. number two, you've witnessed two weeks of officials literally showering hamas with recognition and money. the foreign minister of egypt, the foreign minister of turkey, the president of turkey wants to come. finally, hamas again driving their
on the day's headlines. you are looking at live pictures from cairo where anti-government protesters are spending the night in tahrir square. they are demonstrating against president mohamed morsi's controversial decree granting himself unchecked political power. earlier today, protesters threw rocks at police who responded with tear gas. we'll have much more on this story at the bottom of the hour. >>> an emergency at the u.s. state department today, fire trucks raced to the department headquarters in washington shortly before noon. a flash fire in the duct work of the building forced everyone to evacuate and sent three people to the hospital, one in serious condition. construction workers were among the few people in that building because it is a holiday weekend. >>> investigators are still trying to figure out the source of a gas explosion that damaged more than 40 buildings in springfield, massachusetts, last night. a wwlp camera captured the moment of the blast. 18 people were injured, mostly emergency workers. they had been called to the scene because of reports of a gas smell.
get can caught up on the day's headlines right now. you are looking at live pictures from cairo. where anti-government protesters are spending the night in tahrir square. they are protesting morsi's decree granting himself unchecked political power. earlier today, protesters threw rocks at police who responded with tear gas, we will have more on this story at the bottom of the hour. and an emergency at the u.s. state department today, fire trucks raced to the department headquarters before noon, a flash fire in the duct work of the building forced everyone to evacuate and sent three people in the hospital, construction workers were among the few in the building because it's a holiday weekend. a gas explosion that damaged more than 40 buildings. a camera captured the moment of the blast. mostly emergency workers were injured. they were called to the scene because of reports of the gas smell. they evacuated most of the area an hour before the explosion. superstorm sandy is at $29 billion at cost. governor chris christie said that the final total will only be known after taking into accou
, but they have a relationship with the egyptians. there have been israeli envoys that have gone to cairo to meet with high-ranking egyptian officials. trying to broker a deal. no trust, hamas has to trust for the israelis and israelis have no trust for the hamas. there have been a lot of rockets and missiles coming from gaza into israeli and the israeli air strikes pounded away at targets in garz. a lot of casualties. there's no goodwill on the part of either of these, they don't trust each other. having said that, looks like they're close. hamas seems to think within the next hour or two some agreement will be announced, thanks to the egyptians. but i spoke with the israeli government spokesman for the israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu in the past hour, he said there's no deal yet. he didn't rule out there wouldn't be a deal but he said there's no deal yet. until all of the is are dotted, t richardson cros are crossed. until there's a deal, there's no deal, as they like to say, the diplomatic community. >> we also know the president, president obama, has called and talked to the preside
senior hamas official who said that at 9:00 p.m. cairo time, 10:00 p.m. eastern standard time, that there would be an announcement in cairo, by an official, from the egyptian government and from hamas, announcing some sort of agreement for at least a temporary cease-fire. however, we're hearing from other hamas officials that israel has yet to agree to this proposed cease-fire and the israelis are saying there is nothing as of yet. but the idea is rather than send out broad guidelines for a period of peace and calm, they just want to see if both sides can keep the peace. now, one of the concerns here is that it is not just hamas who is operating in gaza, there are other groups like islamic jihad, affiliated with iran, even smaller splinter groups out there that hamas doesn't necessarily control completely. and therefore that's why they want to give this -- this initial period to see if the peace can indeed or quiet or calm can hold. >> ben, in terms of the entire region, and we're standing sort of by a map which i want to show our viewers, this and is of israel, you've got the
rescind a decree that gives him unlimited power. we get more now from cairo. >> reporter: outrage, clashes, and anguish in tahrir. thousands of angry egyptians back in a public square that has become the arab world's emblem for the democratic right to protest. this was where egyptians demanded the ouster of former president hosni mubarak last year. this time, the fury aimed at current president mohamed morsi. >> we're here because we don't want him to rule us anymore. >> it's a one-man show. he wants to do everything. this is nothing at all what we want. >> reporter: on thursday, the new islamist president made himself the most powerful man in egypt by announcing sweeping decrees he says are designed to push forward the drafting of egypt's new constitution and speed up the formation of a government that still is missing a parliament. >> whether it causes anyone to overturn any of the declarations. that's the same place the parliament is born. technically, it means for now he can do whatever he wants without any oversight. >> i felt he was telling us, you guys don't exist. it's just me and
of the palestinians in gaza. tens of thousands of demonstrators filled the streets of cairo to show their support for the palestinians. egypt's relations with hamas strengthened. but the new administration in that country. protesters in turkey set an israeli flag and photo of benjamin netanyahu ablaze during a demonstration last night. let's go now to the israeli side of the border as we've been reporting israeli tanks and troops have been taking up position there's. cnn's reporter joins us live from the border. fred, thanks for joining us. what you are seeing in the terms of military activity where you are? >> reporter: hi, gary. there is a lot of military activity on this side of the border as well. a lot of it has to do with the big military buildup that's going on here. look at the roads around the area of gaza, a lot of them have been blocked off. they're not accessible anymore to normal people that want go to go through there they're a military operation zone. you're seeing a lot of military hardware on the road, usually on the back of trucks. we see a lot of tanks being delivered here, a l
the border. first i want to go to cairo and reza sayah who's following all the developments there. just a few moments ago, morsi spoke to a huge crowd. what did he say? >> well, he tried to calm things down. he defended his position. he defended the controversial decrees he announced last night telling his opponents that he's part of the revolution, one of the people. certainly at this hour he's got a lot of opponents and critics who do not agree with him and are are expressing their outrage in the streets. dramatic scenes in cairo. very reminiscent of the scenes we saw during the 2011 egyptian revolution. back then it was aimed at former president hosni mubarak. now aimed at mr. morsi. there were some clashes during the protest in tahrir square that are ongoing. the clashes witnesses say were caused by protesters that threw rocks at security forces. the security forces responded by firing tear gas. and back and forth went this cat and mouse game that has been emblematic of these protests. the outranl comes after the decrees last night that many critics are describing as a power grab. one of
may happen next. now, from cairo. >> reporter: demonstrations continue against the egyptian president, mohamed morsy, not the big numbers we saw on friday. but certainly, still a lot of people out here, about 30 tents here, this is an indication that many of these protesters want to be here for a while. it is not clear how long they will stay here. but when you talk to them they seem determined to speak out against mr. morsy's controversial decrees. he is saying that nobody can revise what i say. he is actually throwing the whole system out, totally. >> reporter: meanwhile, big developments in meeting rooms and news conferences, where factions opposed mr. morsy's moves to put pressure on the system. it seemed to weaken the judiciary, by calling for a nationwide judge's strike. also the supreme judicial committee, discussed the attack on the judiciary. they called for a one-million protest and sit-in for tuesday. what does mr. morsy's group do? they call for a one-million man protest, as well on tuesday. some critical days ahead. cairo. >>> elsewhere in the region, the signs the truce
and hamas. the head of hamas is now making a statement in cairo. want to play that for you. >> translator: god took their hand off gaza and can build them to commit themselves to the conditions of the resistance. therefore, if we understand, this simplicity, we can understand as people of the media to tell the brave message of our people to the entire world, because we want the entire world to understand our people and our cause. and through you, we can explain the faces, the pale faces of the leaders of the enemy, because they have failed in their attempt and their attempts back fired against them. they wanted to destroy the infrastructure of the resistance in hamas. today, they claim they have done so, and they have not. this is -- they are bankrupt. i don't deny they have done so much, we could count how many buildings they have destroyed. and how many offices of the media they have destroyed and how many children they have kill ed. and how many journalists and how many photographers they have killed, just like you. we can count how many offices and how many buildings they have destroy
on the young democracy. cnn's reza sayah is in cairo this morning. good morning. >> reporter: good morning, carol. new developments today in tie cairo that could further entangle and muddy what is an already complicated conflict. we have confirmed that next week on december 4th a court in cairo will hear several cases brought against the controversial decrees declared by mr. morsi last week. here's where the intrigue comes in. last week one of his decrees banned anyone, any authority, even the judiciary from questioning and overturning any of his decisions since he took office. we'll see how that plays out. meantime protests continue. there doesn't seem to be a resolution to this conflict. the leaders of the opposition factions have dug in saying we're not going to have dialogue until mr. morsi rescinds his decrees. a few hours ago we spoke to one of his top advisers and we asked him, is that a possibility? >> what kind of concessions are you willing to make. >> this decision is up to the president, not for us. >> is it possible -- is it possible he will rescind his decrees. >> dialogue wi
. in cairo's tahrir square, thousands are chanting for regime change. they say egypt's new president is acting like a dictator. president mohamed morsi granted himself sweeping new powers yesterday, basically morsi now has absolute power for six months. his opponents say he's acting like a new pharaoh. the u.s. state department is calling for calm and encouraging all parties to work together. morsi declared all his laws, all his decrees are final and cannot be overturned or appealed until egypt's new constitution is put in place. just days ago, people around the world were praising morsi for his pivotal role in negotiating the israel/hamas cease-fire. today, protesters set fire to a symbol of morsi's power, the muslim brotherhood headquarters in alexandria, egypt. morsi supporters clashed with protesters there. morsi is defending his new powers, saying he's not taking sides and the steps he took are meant to achieve political and social stability. reza sayah joins us live in cairo. reza, is morsi's government strong enough, so early in this administration, to withstand this level of
, police firing tear gas. fight for democracy intensifying there. cairo's tie rear square. grounds for protester. you hear the chanting. demonstrators are not leaving the square until president morsi withdraws the sweeping powers he granted himself last week. ressa sayah joining us live from cairo. it was billed as the opposition's biggest show of force yet. demonstrators converging, various points throughout the city. what do they hope to accomplish? what is the message? >> reporter: the message is they want to either oust president morsi or have him reverse his controversial decrees announced last thursday. this is an incredible site here behind us the tahrir squire, billed as 1 million man demonstration. not sure if there are 1 million people here, but certainly at lot of people. i'll zoom into tahrir square. the crowd is loud, energized, excited. tens of thousands of people here representing different factions in egypt. representing women's rights groups, western-style liberals, secularists, moderates. all have banded together in a show of force, in a show of opposition, agains
of the palestinian authority in the west bank, president mahmood abbas and then she will fly to cairo to meet with mohamed morsi. she won't meet with hamas which the u.s. government regards as a terrorist organization. netanyahu met last hour with secretary of state ban ki-moon. the two met with reporters only moments ago. >> unfortunately, mr. secretary, hamas and islamic jihad and the other terrorist groups do not share your concern about our civilian casualties or about civilian casualties at all. >> that was the israeli prime minister meeting with the u.s. secretary-general ban ki-moon. earlier today israel put an all-out ground assault of gaza on hold,age i'm quoting, to give limited time for a diplomatic solution. egypt sees an end to the gaza conflict, that's see. president morsi says, the travesty of the israeli aggression on ga did will end in a few hours ap christiane amanpour is here and watching what's going on. the diplomacy is intense right now but it's by no means a done deal. >> it's not a done deal but by all the signals we're getting, it looks like both sides feel they are j
supporters and police if cairo. and egypt's highest judicial body called on morsy to stay out of all judicial matters. >>> life is returning to normal in gaza three days after hamas militants and israel agreed to stop fighting. children returned to school today. despite a shooting near the border yesterday that reportedly left one palestinian dead, the cease-fire is holding. the next phase of the truce, talks on potentially easing israel's blockade in gaza and opening border crossings. the hope is this cease-fire will hold. joining us right now is a man who knows the area quite well, edward dejarian is the former u.s. ambassador to both israel and syria. he helped establish the james baker institute for public policy at rice university in houston. ambassador, good to see you. >> good to see you. >> so how confident are you about this truce thus far? >> so far, i think it's holding. and that's obviously a good sign. there have been minor violations. but the important thing is to build on this truce. in every crisis i think there is an opportunity. and if the truce is just to become a prolonged
for himself a new dictatorship. reza sayah is in cairo right now. do these protesters have a point? is this the same style of leadership that triggered the arab spring? >> if you ask the protesters if they have a point, they'll give you an emphatic yes. these are demonstrators who believe the revolution, the principles of the 2011 revolution is in jeopardy, and they believe its current president mohammed morsi who has put those principles in jeopardy. all this outrage and fury as the outcome of a set of decrees suddenly announced on thursday night. these give them sweeping powers and it seems to be an effort to push through the drafting of egypt's all new constitution. one of the decrees says that no one, not even the judiciary can overturn and appeal any of mr. morsi's declarations, decisions since he took office in june. this order seems to be put in place until a parliament is in place. several months from now. technically this is a man who can do whatever he wants for the next few months without any oversight. that's one of the decrees, fredricka, that people here are outraged
. >>> tear gas in cairo near the u.s. embassy as the fight for democracy goes on. >> face to face. susan rice and john mccain, the man who wanted watergate style hearings, meet. and only cnn catches up with mccain before the big meeting. >> what do you have to learn today from miss rice? >> whatever ambassador rice wants to tell me. she's the one who asked for the meeting. i didn't. >> wouldn't you like to be a fly on the wall? >>> spyfall, real-life bond movie. yasser arafat's body was exhumed. was the palestinian leader po h poisoned by israeli spies? >>> plus this. >> you said walden is in trouble. >> i'm the trouble walden has been in, repeatedly. >> he calls it filth, the half in "two and a half men" begs you not to watch his show. "newsroom" starts now. >>> good morning to you. thank you so much for being with us. i'm carol costello. we begin with a high stakes meeting just minutes from now. this hour, the u.s. ambassador to the united nations will muster all of her diplomatic skills and tiptoe through a political mine field. susan rice meets with republican senator john mccain. as you
. israel denies losing any aircraft. egypt is trying to stop this war before it is too late. cairo's intelligence chief is spearheading talks to end the violence. but on the border, peace looks like an unlikely prospect. our senior international correspondent, ben wedeman joins us now between the border between israel and gaza. ben, ground war, are we about to witness that? >> reporter: i don't think immediately, don. i think there's still time needed to get the israeli military ready for a ground invasion. keep in mind that gaza is an area just twice the size of washington, d.c., with a population of 1.5 million people. any military force that goes in there has got to contend with the possibility of a lot of civilian casualties and a fair amount of resistance, from hamas fighters. now, what we're seeing here on the border are intense preparations, all night long. we've been watching as big trucks carrying tanks, carrying armored personnel carriers have been going up and down the road. a lot of soldiers in this area. the israeli government has yet to say when or if they would final
a seven-hour journey from cairo. now they've lined up down the street, each of them are showing their identifications to security forces and then heading into gaza. we've asked them, when you think you'll come back. they say we don't know, we're just happy we're going in. are you scared? >> yeah, absolutely i'm scared. you hear bombs, you don't know what you're going in there for. but i think that's -- i think that's what we've got to do. you have to be scared and overcome that fear by just going in there. >> reporter: as more demonstrators continue to file into gaza, back in cairo, the arab league, a group of 22 arab states announced tuesday they're going to send in more than two dozen arab foreign ministers into gaza, part of the push to publicly stand with the palestinians. also the chief in talks with hamas officials and it's really officials trying to establish a cease fire, the same spy chief that in 2011 helped secure the release of israeli soldier sha least. many say if there is going to be a ceasefire, egypt's spy chief is going to play a key role. reza sayah, cnn at th
. protesters on the streets of cairo for a fourth straight day. you can see the crowds there. battle lines are now drawn. we're talking about newly empowered islamists versus remnants of the mubarak regime and the country's deeply divided liberals. they're going at it. the president's new powers now. today egyptian president mohammed morsi is meeting with the country's top judges to explain the extraordinary powers that he granted himself on thursday. among the decrees, judges cannot overturn any decision he makes or a law he imposes until a new constitution is finalized. mr. morsi extended the time to write the new constitution and he dismissed the country's attorney general. reza sayah is overlooking everything in tahrir square. most of us were thinking that mohammed morsi really very much the peacemaker, key to the cease-fire between israel and hamas. doesn't even settle with the truce and then morsi announces this decree essentially a huge power grab. what is the significance? >> reporter: well, suzanne, the significance is until a parliament is formed here in egypt, until a constituti
because morsi hails from the brotherhood, a political cousin to hamas. we are joined from cairo. how are egyptians feeling about this cease-fire this morning? >> reporter: well, if you're the leadership of the muslim brotherhood in cairo you're patting yourself on the back today because they really came out looking very favorably in the international community throughout this process. this is a big test for egypt's government led now but the muslim brotherhood. a talk show host had a lot of concern. would this be a movement that would take up arms? would this be a movement that would give material support for hamas. it turns out that those fears, the way things stand right now turned out to be groundless. it looks like this is a government that's approached this very even handedly to keep their peace treaty and their economic alliances with washington and western capitals. in the end it doesn't look like this is a government that wanted to be seen as radical in the community. >>> back at home u.s. ambassador susan rice is speaking out about those talking points that she delivered on
that film that scurrilous film was made and attacks on the embassy in cairo and he was not quick to condemn the attacks and president obama let him know that the alliance was actually in question over that. but they seem to have gotten along very well over the efforts to combined effort to end the gaza conflict and we're on the phone a lot and both sides say, you know, achieved some sort of rappaport. >> thank you very much. >>> and just in, we're getting word the army private accused of leaking secrets to wick leaks is right now on the stand testifying in his defense. that's next. in that time there've been some good days. and some difficult ones. but, through it all, we've persevered, supporting some of the biggest ideas in modern history. so why should our anniversary matter to you? because for 200 years, we've been helping ideas move from ambition to achievement. and the next great idea could be yours. ♪ and the next great idea could be yours. you know it can be hard to lbreathe, and how that feels.e, copd includes chronic bronchitis and emphysema. spiriva helps control my copd sympto
countries out of the meeting that they had in cairo, to show up here in gaza, perhaps tomorrow. we are waiting also to hear what is going to happen when it comes to the ground troops that israel has amassed on the border. now, right now we're hearing the sound of planes. and that usually means only one thing, that there will be air strikes that follow. and it is this time of night into the wee hours in the morning that things get very, very intense with lots of glass, air strikes. but we know that there have been blasts coming from the israeli ships in the sea. we ourselves have experienced loud booms and bangs coming from the sea, right there along the water. so there are concerns, people are not in the streets. most have hunkered down in their homes. most of the businesses have been closed. we know that more people have been killed here, including militants and civilians. and we know that more people have been injured. sara sidner. >> this is just unbelievable, this photo of a baby, the staffer holding the baby son. his name is omar. he was fatally burned, according to reports. b
important. now the secretary general ban ki-moon is in cairo. so there's a lot of pressure, the u.s. would certainly like to see a cessation of hostilities, the israelis are anxious for that to happen. they want to see what's going on. one of the things that the israelis point out is that yes, hamas is in charge and they hold that group responsible. but there's other groups in gaza that may not completely been under the control of hamas. that could be one of the problems even though one of the -- saying hamas is responsibility for any rockets that come into israel right now. some of the civilian casualties we saw today, there will be a lot more if israeli tanks or armored personnel carries or israeli troops move into that heavily populated area, but they're saying and the prime minister said today, benjamin net tanya -- netanyahu. >> wolf blitzer -- president obama is monitoring the conflict in the middle east as he travels through asia. today in thailand, he said the u.s. will work with all parties to end the violence. later today, mr. obama makes history when he becomes the first u.s. pr
and president mohamed morsi say discussions are under way in cairo and arab league foreign ministers are set to visit gaza on tuesday. violence has become a daily nightmare for people living in gaza. anderson cooper joins us now. take us to the ground and what's going on. what you seeing and hearing? >> it's about 2:00 a.m. here. we have heard a number of large explosions this evening. just a few in the last hour or so. this is generally the time when the strikes actually intensify. that's what we have seen over the last several nights. you can hear drones circling overhead, over gaza city as they have been since the conflict began. it's a constant sound, a constant reminder of the israeli forces watching the city. as you mentioned there was a strike. the israeli military said was a house owned by a hamas commander of an artillerary unit, initially, they said they killed that commander and then walked that back and said they couldn't be clear if he was at the house at the time. ten members of another family were staying at the house. they were all killed. our arwa damon was on the scene, saw
will arrive in cairo tomorrow. both israelis and palestinians say the solution must come from the other side. >> we are trying to drive home a message to hamas, that they cannot shoot at israeli civilians, try to kill israeli civilianes with impunity. we have been trying to keep down the amount of civilian deaths on their side. compare that to hamas on us. they are trying to maximize the amount of civilians that they kill. that's the different between a terrorist organization and democratic country. >> i think it takes two to tango here. the ambassador knows that israel invoked hamas by taking out one of their -- on wednesday. they knew that hamas and other fashions would retaliate. so they are also to be blamed for the violence between the gaza strip and israel. it's time for the united states, for international community, to force and pressure israel to lift the siege and that i believe will lead it putting an end to these facilities across the border. >> >>> president barack obama is in asia at this hour but not everyone is happy about his latest stop. the important political figure he is
in cairo for talks tomorrow and arab league foreign ministers are set to visit gaza on tuesday. but both israelis and palestinians say the solution must come from the other side. >> we are trying to drive home the message to hamas that they cannot shoot at israeli civilians, try to kill israeli civilians with impunity and we've been able to reduce to a remarkable extent the amount of civilian casualties on their side. compare that to what hamas is doing to us. they're trying to maximize the number of israeli civilians they kill. that's the difference between a terrorist organization and a democratic country. >> i think, the ambassador knows that it was israel who provoked hamas by taking arms with one of the commanders on wednesday. they knew that hamas and other actions in the gaza strip would retaliate, so they also are to be blamed for this escalation in the violence between the gaza strip and israel. it's time for the united states and the international community to force and pressure israel to lift the siege, and that, i believe, will lead to putting an end. >> meanwhile, palestinia
, no the a premeditated response to of what had transpired in cairo. >> so how did that happen? how was that accurate at the time? if we know that this was in fact a premeditated, not spontaneous occurrence? >> well, we don't know the degree it was premeditated. that's still something that's under investigation. how much advance planning was there or was this planned within 24 hours or the same day. so that's a question we still have to the get to the bottom of, but the important point in terms of the ambassador's statement on that sunday talk program is she was using the intelligence community's best estimate. at that time when she appeared on the sunday talk shows, the intelligence community still believed that that began as a protest, that, yes, there were terrorists and extremists involved, but that it began as a protest. so i don't see how we can fall the ambassador for using what the intelligence community said was their best assessment. in fact, in my view if she had deviated from that, if she had departed from what the intelligence community said they thought took place, then she would have b
protest in cairo, top association of judges want every judge to walk off the job. they are angry because of a decree giving mohamed morsi unchecked power. they call the decree an unprecedented attack. >>> an irish newspaper editor resigned after publishing topless photographs of kate. kate is sun bathing with prince william on vacation in a private home. a french magazine first published the photos. >>> a shootout in alabama left a deputy sheriff dead and another in critical condition. deputy scott ward was killed yesterday when the deputies responded to a family dispute in a mobile home. the gunman was also killed during that confrontation. >>> superstorm sandy has cost new jersey more than $29 billion in damage and that number could easily rise. governor chris christie's office said the final total will only be known taking into account next summer's tourism season. governor cuomo will ask the federal government for $30 billion to help with his state's recovery. >>> investigators in the west bank are getting ready to open the tomb of yasser arafat. it will be exhumed on tuesday. it wil
to breaking news out of cairo, egypt. protesters are outraged at egyptian president mohamed morsi's power grab. thousands have gathered calling it the birth of a new pharaoh. attacking the headquarters of morsi's political party in alexandria and set it on fire according to egyptian tv. reza sayah joins us on the phone from tarir square. set the scene for us. reza, are you there? >> reporter: hello? >> reza, can you hear me? >> reporter: carol, i apologize. it is very loud here. i'm going to have a terribly difficult time hearing you. we are at tahrir square where thousands of people have come to protest against egyptian president mohamed morsi and there appears to be clashes between security forces and protest protesters in tahrir square. we just saw hundreds of people run i running away from security forces. we can report that tear gas has been shot in the air, we're assuming by security forces. it's remarkable here, carol, we're hear iing what we heard t years ago during revolution that toppled president mubarak, that people want to topple the regime. you're hearing it again, the anger and
. next week a court in cairo will attempt to decide whether it is even a constitutional move. reza sayah is live for us in cairo. before we talk about how he's justifying the powers, you're getting new information on a huge move from the muslim brotherhood. reza, are you with me? we're going to work on getting -- >> reporter: brooke, the muslim brotherhood has canceled their 1 million man demonstration. of course it could energize the opposition factions behind us with their 1 million man demonstration, but there is absolutely no indication at this point that the muslim brotherhood is losing support. remember, this is a powerful organization, one of the most powerful organizations in the political landscape, in egypt, and at this point, i think many people will look at this at face value, someone sensible in the muslim brotherhood made the decision they have competing demonstrations tomorrow that could be the potential for violence. several days have passed since the decrees and the outcome hasn't been pleasant. was this just a bad miscalculation by the president? >> not at all. it is a
protesters spent another day on the streets of cairo, calling their president the new pharaoh. fearful of another dictatorship. at least one demonstrator was killed today. the opposition says he died after inhaling excessive amounts of tear gas. tahrir square now look at this, a tent city. demonstrators say this is where they will remain until president mohamed morsi backs away from his controversial decree, which says no person, no authority can overrule his decisions until a new constitution is put in place. >>> tissue samples from yasser arafat's body are in the hands of forensic experts. his grave was opened today in ramallah. samples were taken from his remains. the exact cause of the former palestinian leader's death has long been a mystery. now testing will be done to find out if arafat was in fact poisons. >> the indications we have or the convictions we have that israel have done this assassination but yet we still need evidence. >> israel meantime denied those allegations. >>> a fiery scene in downtown sydney, australia, today. look at this with me and you'll see a cab, look
and they are not good for americans. the u.s. embassy in cairo has been closed. protesters are blocking the entrance, and the clashes are happening very, very close by. there is no indication at this time, however, that our embassy there is threatened. stay tuned. we'll keep you posted to the developments in that country. >>> and also in the middle east, we are seeing a rare moment of cooperation today between the palestinian authority and hamas. it's coming thousands of miles away from where they usually live. they're in new york, and both sides want their united nations status elevated. what does that mean? does it really do anything for them? basically, it's part of the palestinian effort, going on for decades now, to be an official country. equal in status with israel, and the united states. and anybody else belonging to the u.n. just for some context here, though, the plo has been a permanent observer. that's been their status since 1974. and that has given palestinians the right to speak out and be heard at the assembly. but it doesn't give them a right to vote. richard roth, who covers the u.
their children is our blood too. >> now to cairo and reza sayah, he joins me now. egypt condemns the israeli attacks, but so far says it will not break a long-standing agreement with israel. so what kind of bind is egyptian president morsi in over this conflict? >> reporter: well, he certainly has to walk a tight rope and mohamed morsi, the egyptian president is learning how quickly how difficult it is to be the president of egypt. here is why the situation is packed with so much drama and intrigue. for more than 30 years, mohamed morsi, a member of the muslim brotherhood and the movement were on the outside to israeli/palestinian conflict. they didn't have much of a role under the mubarak regime. then came the revolution, in came the muslim brotherhood, very influential in this current government, with the promise that they're going to change things, that they're no longer going to tolerate and put up with israeli aggression and oppression of the palestinians, and this is the promise that they have made so far. they have delivered a lot of rhetoric, condenecticudemnation seems like that's a
of the operations. >> thank you very much, fred. the arab league is holding an emergency session in cairo, ejiment, to discuss the gaza/israel conflict. they say the bloc should review the peace proposals to israel and its entire stance on the peace process in response to the conflict in gaza. >> protesters have taken to the streets in arab countries to show their solidarity to palestinians in gaza. tens of thousands of protesters filled the streets in egypt's capital. protesters in the nation of turkey set an israeli flag on fire, also a photo of benjamin netanyahu during a demonstration last evening. >>> president obama makes history this weekend with a three-nation tour of asia. the president is on his way to thailand right now, but it are rr the second leg of the trip that makes it historic, he's visiting myanmar. he wraps up his oversees trip in cambodia. he'll attend the east asia summit before returning to the united states on wednesday. >> rescue planes are still searching for two crew members missing after an oil rig exploding in the gulf of mexico. at least 11 people were injured in the
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